CrossFit Kids and Teens!!!


CrossFit is gaining wider popularity with youth just as CrossFit is in the adult world.  Our CrossFit Kids (CFK) certified program also exists at more than 1,800 gyms and 1,000 schools today. (CrossFit Kids, 2014)  The reason behind this phenomenal growth is what CrossFit does for our kids.  CFK emphasizes good movement throughout childhood and adolescence.  Using principles of mechanics, consistency and intensity (appropriate for each age level), CFK

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Coach “Fuzzy” Karl with one of his classes

brings fitness, confidence, enhanced sports performance and fewer sports injuries to our kids.  There is a vast amount of research that indicates exercise is beneficial to cognitive function which has a positive impact on a child’s academic achievement.  [Exercise] for kids provides an active alternative to sedentary activities like watching TV, playing video games or laying around the house which translates to less childhood obesity and all-around better health for our children. (CrossFit Kids, 2014)

There is common misconception that CrossFit and weightlifting are dangerous for children.  First let’s address CrossFit.  One of the great benefits of CrossFit is that it scales to any individual’s abilities.  Whether a second grader or a high school varsity wrestler, the fitness needs differ by degree not by kind.  The program is scalable for any age or experience level and accounts for the varied maturation status one can find in a class full of kids.

 

Children can improve strength by 30% to 50% after just 8 to 12 weeks of a well-designed strength training program. Youth need to continue to train at least 2 times per week to maintain strength. (Dahab, MD & McCambridge MD, FAAP, 2009)

 

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Dynamo Kids/Teens promotes making activity fun and ingrains working together!

In 1983 the American Academy of Pediatrics issued a report that essentially said the weightlifting for young children was dangerous because it could injure the growth plates and stunt growth.  More recent studies found that weightlifting injuries to growth plates were primarily due to misuse of equipment, inappropriate weight, improper technique or lack of qualified adult supervision.  These studies also found that proper strength training actually benefits children by improving motor skills, building bone density and better preparing children for the demands of youth sports.  In 2001 the American Academy of Pediatrics reversed its earlier position and issued its new policy, “Strength training programs for pre-adolescents and adolescents can be safe and effective if proper resistance training techniques and safety precautions are followed.” (Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness, 2001)

 

“If appropriate training guidelines are followed, regular participation in a youth strength-training program has the potential to increase bone mineral density, improve motor performance skills, enhance sports performance, and better prepare young athletes for the demands of practice and competition.”   – Dr. Avery Faigenbaum

 

Kyla teaching the squat

Coach Kyla teaching the squat

 

Dynamo Kids

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Your children will be learning new skills they can’t wait to show you!

At CrossFit Dynamo (CFD), we call our youth programs Dynamo Kids and Dynamo Teens.  The definition of a Dynamo is “a hard-working, energetic person.”  All of our kids are Dynamos!  The typical age group of Dynamo Kids is 5 to 12 years of age (elementary school) and the Dynamo Teens program is geared for ages 12 to 18 (middle and high school).  Our kid’s coaching staff all have their CrossFit Level 1 Certifications as well as CF Kids Certifications!   At CFD, we also provide a safe environment for your children.  All of the CrossFit Dynamo staff members are background checked whether they work directly with the children or not.

In addition to being safe, Dynamo Kids is big FUN!  CrossFit workouts are constantly varied so we do not do the same thing over and over.  We also play games that reinforce our learning and invigorate our bodies.  We build community within our kids groups which is also part of the CrossFit methodology and what makes CrossFit Dynamo stand out from its peers.  When kids are in community they learn good sportsmanship, build confidence and self-esteem.  A typical class involves a warm-up, learning a new skill or refining an existing one, the workout of the day (WoD) and a game.  When our kids are done they have had a full 40 to 50 minutes of exercise but in their minds they just had 50 minutes of fun.  Bring your child in for a free class and let them experience Dynamo Kids/Teens firsthand.

Class Schedule and Pricing

Our class schedule follows the Forsyth County school calendar.  Currently we are enrolling for our Fall 2017 Session which will run August 14th(Kids)/August 7th (Teens) through December 13th (Kids) /December 22nd (Teens), 2017.

 

Dynamo Kids

(5-12 yo, must be in elementary school)

Monday, Wednesday 4:40pm – 5:30pm 10 Class Punch ($120)

20 Class Punch ($240)

30 Class Punch ($360)

(Drop  ins $15)

 ——————————  ———————————————  ———————————  ——————
Dynamo Teens (12+ yo) Monday & Wednesday 7:30pm to 8:30pm  

Fall “A”  8/7 – 9/22 ($190)

2x/wk ($126.67)

Fall “B” 10/2 – 12/22 ($330)

2x/wk ($220)

(Drop ins $15)

& Friday 6:30pm to 7:30pm

Sibling discount of 15% for each additional child enrolled after the first one.  If you’re starting late, but still want in, we’ll simply prorate for the rest of the semester.

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Our program promotes self-confidence and a CAN DO attitude! Coach Karl with a class!

 

Refererences

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The response when we asked “What are some ways we can encourage each other?”

Committee on Sports Medicine and Fitness. (2001). Strength Traning by Children and Adolescants. American Academy of Pediatrics, 1470-1472.

CrossFit Kids. (2014). Retrieved from CrossFit Kids: https://kids.crossfit.com/

Dahab, MD, K. S., & McCambridge MD, FAAP, T. M. (2009). Strength Training in Children and Adolescents. Sports Health, 223-226.

 

Other good links

http://boxlifemagazine.com/kids-weightlifting-how-young-is-too-young/

http://www.ncbi.nlm.nih.gov/pmc/articles/PMC3445252/